Announcement: Content Changes.

The theme here has been of mystical nature with clear theories followed by  personalized analyses. Many of these posts have since then been removed as I venture towards a more freeing format, one that may often rely on original publication being elsewhere. Please stick close for links to my work as it comes about and whatever else may appear (originally) here.

As always, it will contain nothing short of genuine passion.

wonderblack“Alice laughed. ‘There’s no use trying,’ she said. ‘One can’t believe impossible things.’ I daresay you haven’t had much practice,’ said the Queen. ‘When I was your age, I always did it for half-an-hour a day. Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.” -Lewis Carrol

 

image belongs to www.tremendousonly.fr

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Float Tank + Eclipse +Meditation = ?

Theory: Float Tank sessions have the ability to positively influence your body and mind. Doing so during an Eclipse affects the experience and doing so while meditating may intensify the results (with or without the Eclipse).

A float tank is a pitch black, fully enclosed, sound proof chamber filled with 10 inches or so of body temperature water and a hefty amount of Epsom Salt. You hear nothing, see nothing, and physically feel nothing.
The amount of Salt depends on the size of the chamber but a quick internet search presents multiple reports of about 850 pounds as the average. I was told the float tank I did had 1000 pounds of the highest quality Epsom Salt you can buy and that this creates buoyancy 7 times denser than the Dead Sea. My experience is shared near the end.

The salt and water ratio makes you float. You can’t sink. You’re completely safe to enter deep meditative and sleeping states. Sessions range from an hour to overnight.

The concept was first developed for use in Psychology Experiments in 1954. Referred to as a sensory deprivation tank, John C. Lilly built it with intention of heightening mental ability by allowing the individual to focus without distraction from the senses. Current year, the tanks are used as alternative medicine comparable with what someone would use massage therapy or acupuncture for.

Leading up to its more mainstream therapeutic reputation, sensory deprivation tanks have been used for various other purposes. The scheme of MK Ultra, supposedly used these tanks as part of their mind opening experiments in the early 50s. The MK Ultra experiments are referenced in the popular TV series, Stranger Things. At one point in an episode of Stranger Things, a young psychic girl is lowered into a water tank (sensory deprivation, isolation tank) and uses it to intensify her focus and enter a different dimension where a horrendous creature roams. Given my extreme susceptibility to wild imagination roaming, I really shouldn’t have watched that episode a week before my float tank venture.

Clearly there is a wild, almost psychedelic, side to general physical and emotional benefits of floating in an isolation tank. In fact, on the waiting room table where I had my float tank session lye a book entitled Get High Now (without drugs).

It is likely you have to be open to these types of otherworldly experiences to actually receive them though. So if unlocking your mind isn’t your cup of tea, you may simply partake in the general benefits.

Often when an activity lists substantial benefits it is immediately considered over exaggerated by the realist, cut the crap community. Each of these benefits are possible and probable, not definite and not easily documented because they are personal experience.
Benefits of using a Float Tank:

– Total Relaxation

– Stress reduction and illness associated with stress (lower blood pressure and cortisol levels)

– Toxin cleansing

– Anxiety, PTSD, TBI relief and healing

– Enhances creativity

– Improves focus

– Reduction in addiction related cravings, including eating

– Endorphin releasing (potential to last for days)

– Pain management including chronic pain

– Speeds recovery from strenuous activity and injury

– Improves athletic performance

– Helps minor wounds

– Speeds recover from Jet Lag

– Brain Hemispheric and pattern alignment


This list is not all inclusive especially when a person chooses to combine the benefits of meditation to their session. 100 Benefits of Mediation 

There is also claim of Superlearning because the ability to learn new information is greatly intensified while in the tank (though I do not know where the source of information would be coming from).

I can tell you what I experienced without a doubt was total relaxation, endorphin release, lasting anxiety relief, stress reduction, creativity increase, greater awareness, muscle tension release, and maybe even some spinal alignment.

Before I get into my personal experience floating, I want to touch on potential spiritual meaning pertaining to an Eclipse event. As it so happens, the day and time I scheduled my 90 minute float session the eclipse was taking place. I did not do this intentionally.


An eclipse is a cosmic event therefore deeper meanings are never short in supply. Unfortunately most of what I found was negative in nature because of the darkening of the Sun and of course, I determined this about thirty minutes before the session.
I did, however, find solace in the one positive thing I read stating those who have been spiritually active throughout the year may actually experience the opposite effect of negative energy and even a 20% increase in power from their divinity. Of course, I also found comfort in the most basic wisdom of taking everything with a grain of salt.

The negative energy referenced is called Raja-Tama. It has negative effects on humanity and img_2217ill-intentioned ghosts supposedly use it to inflict harm as well. Raja-Tama is said to increase during an eclipse due to the blackening of the sun.

At risk of getting carried away, I chose to omit this particular information from my memory during the float.
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Given their excellence, my husband and I went to Healing Waters in Denver, CO for a 90 minute float session coupled with an initial inversion table tip and binaural beats listen. Upon our arrival, we small talked with the host. She brought up the eclipse and mentioned we likely wouldn’t know if we were experiencing anything to do with it since it was our first float. I did a mind’s eye “phew!” with a wrist across the forehead and did not mention Raja-Tama.


I watched the instructional video beforehand, listened to about ten minutes of “creative inspiration with beach sounds” binary beats at a 95 degree angle, and then got ready to step in.

I opened the door and shined my phone flashlight in the black tank to alleviate some of that fear of the unknown… Yup, looks normal.

Down the rabbit hole.

Once in, I closed my eyes and crossed my limbs knowing I’d loosen up soon enough. It took a few minutes and lunging for the door once… ok, twice… to feel safe. I gave in and dropped all effort; I sensed I was starting to drift left then right. Only when my feet touched the bottom of the tank did I realize how far I’d drifted. It was alarming but once repositioned in the center; I deemed it normal to float around a bit and chilled.
After a few minutes of breathing meditation I allowed myself to chase a few thoughts and landed on the notion that claustrophobia cannot exist if one cannot perceive boundaries. I didn’t feel claustrophobic but the instructional video had mentioned this notion and it was amusing to test.

The darkness wasn’t an issue when I realized it was just kind of like being invisible for a time. What introvert doesn’t want that every once in a while?
I started to pay attention to my body; the more I let go of muscle control the more any remaining tension eased. I even heard a few little pops while my upper back loosened up. I experimented with the water density, playfully moving side to side.
I soon went back to meditating then decided to open my eyes which of course, proved no different than having them closed. Water conveniently dripped from the tank ceiling into them. Hammily, I slipped and slid around until I found the door handle and doused my burning eye with fresh water then returned to the tank… eyes closed.
I went back and forth between thought and meditation the rest of the time (quiet chimes play to end the session).

I left soft and relaxed.

A little something, something I took with me from my session stems from self-reflection, one leaf from that stem being fear.
If it’s not already evident, peppered throughout this post, I discovered a predisposition to fear and amplification as an initial reaction to most everything. Fear is great protection from danger and opportunity. The latter, not so ideal.


The only mind unlocking I did was personal barrier removal and I only visually saw small lights that weren’t physically there. It’s hard to say if that was psychedelic or not and honestly, I mentally avoided exploring them. Given this was my first time, it makes sense the mind portion of the experience would be mild.
I was simply relaxed and felt good. A day later I returned to work and noticed I was much calmer and balanced.

Superstition: Not as fake as we may think

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Theory: It is possible to alter an outcome by performing specific rituals and avoiding others.

It’s likely that at some point you’ve “knocked on wood,” thought twice about going out on Friday the 13th, or believed you had “beginner’s luck” without questioning the phrases origin. Of course then, there are those who also who hoard lettuce to counteract the effects of wine (what!?) and regularly wear a blue bead to protect themselves from those vexatious little witches. Countless old wives tales, beliefs, and misconceptions exist, many of which people still believe in some capacity.

Friday-13th

A psychological approach to understanding any truth behind these practices and beliefs indicate a strong correlation between the belief and the person’s search for selective information that confirms their belief. This confirmation bias would possibly explain beliefs like having bad luck on Friday the 13th. Since you believe the day will only produce doom, you will likely only recall negative events when summarizing your day.

Before our attempt to validate superstition is dismissed as a mind trick we play on ourselves, we can consider other theories to increase its legitimacy. Consider the Law of Attraction. It’s vastness and alleged power deems it worthy of its own post (foreshadowing), but in short suggests that we attract the same energy that we project. The evidence on the Law of Attraction’s authority is extensive and if assumed true, superstitions are powerful guides to projecting energy we wish to receive back or detrimental to our reality if we unintentionally project negativity through superstition (shoot, I stepped on a crack). So, if you believe that because you are a beginner, you will do better than you would normally, you likely will. The belief you form initiates feelings of power and skill that will attract a similar return. This is also possibly the reason why when one bad thing happens more follow. Negative energy attracts more negative energy… or at least according to a vague application of the Law of Attraction.

fake

The quest to declare superstition plausible should also include my favorite concept, the self-fulfilling prophecy. The phrase, “fake it till you make it” holds supremacy because of this prophecy. In extremity, if you fake with passion that you are famous, your actions will naturally fall in line with what a famous person may do and those actions will then create the genuine fame you already believed you had. Relating this to superstition… if you believe something will happen because you did or did not do something, you will act in a manor that will fulfill your original assumption and make it true.

As for “lucky charms,” experiments conducted by researchers conclude their luck is really derived in the holders manifestation of confidence into the charm. Participants who were told they were given something lucky to help them complete a task performed significantly better then when given an item that was “ordinary” despite there being no difference between the items. This sounds an awful lot like the placebo effect, but does it make superstition any less true? There is power in belief and maybe “luck” is just positive belief that is strongly associated with a visual image of something like a rabbit’s foot or special matching socks.

“The prejudices of superstition are superior to all others, and have the strongest influence on the human mind.” -Charles de Montesquieu.

Although synonyms for superstition are literally “fantasy,” “fallacy,” “delusion,” and “misconception,” its definitely possible we accidentally make these little beliefs reality. Therefore, superstition IS real… it’s just not made from hexes and fairy dust.

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Announcement: Content Changes.

The theme here has been of mystical nature with clear theories followed by  personalized analyses. Many of these posts have since then been removed as I venture towards a more freeing format, one that may often rely on original publication being elsewhere. Please stick close for links to my work as it comes about and whatever else may appear (originally) here.

As always, it will contain nothing short of genuine passion.

wonderblack“Alice laughed. ‘There’s no use trying,’ she said. ‘One can’t believe impossible things.’ I daresay you haven’t had much practice,’ said the Queen. ‘When I was your age, I always did it for half-an-hour a day. Why, sometimes I’ve believed as many as six impossible things before breakfast.” -Lewis Carrol

 

image belongs to www.tremendousonly.fr